Green Spots gets a new portable mural thanks to local artists!

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Thanks to the great initiative and organization of HAT supporter and local artist, Joanne Thomson, Green Spots has a new portable mural to use in upcoming education and outreach programs. Advised by HAT staff, Joanne came up with the idea to create a mural that depicts Green Spots students at work on their school grounds, removing invasive plants like Himalayan Blackberry, Scotch broom and English Ivy to allow native species like Common and Great (Grand) Camas (purple-blue flowers in foreground) Buttercup (yellow flowers among the Camas), and Seablush (pink flowers in background) to re-establish. Joanne, with the help of a team of wonderful local artists, painted this mural in the hopes that it will help spread the message to youngsters about the importance of native plants to our local ecosystems and empower them to make a positive change for nature in their community by gardening with native plants. 
We want to extend our heartfelt thanks to Joanne and all of the artists involved in the making of this mural. We are so excited to share your beautiful contribution with our Green Spots kids!

Photos courtesy of Joanne Thomson, Ashlea Veldhoen, Ann Schau & artist participants

Green Spots Mural Project 2019

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The Great Canadian Giving Challenge 2019

Join the Great Canadian Giving Challenge by donating to HAT before June 30th, 2019!

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Every dollar donated in June is a chance for us to WIN!

Donate to HAT during the month of June and automatically enter us to WIN $10,000 during the Great Canadian Giving Challenge. Every $1 donation is one entry into the contest for HAT! 

Just a single donation could help us restore a plot of native habitat, supply materials for our educational programs, or help us improve habitat for species at risk!

If you win the $10,000 prize for HAT, you can make an even bigger difference! $10,000 could supply over 75 bat boxes to support over 15,000 bats, 100 Western Screech-owl nest boxes, build and care for native plant learning gardens at our Green Spots Schools, or purchase equipment needed to conduct restoration in threated habitats across south Vancouver Island.

Search for 'Habitat Acquisition Trust' on Canada HelpsThe Great Canadian Giving Challenge or click here!

Then, pick your way to give: give once or schedule monthly donations, donate securities or mutual funds, or fundraise.

Search
Find us on Canada Helps: Habitat Acquisition Trust

Donate through Canada Helps or our Website
Every $1* donated on CanadaHelps.org is a chance to win!(*Minimum $3 donation required).

Celebrate
The winner will be announced on July 1st, 2019.

Support HAT today and make a BIG impact!a885767b.canada helps logo

THE MORE YOU GIVE, THE MORE CHANCES HAT WILL WIN!

You could make a difference today!

- Enhance bat and Western Screech-owl habitat through installing bat boxes and nest boxes in critical habitat and give them a fighting chance.

- Provide native plants for a pollinator hedgerow or habitat restoration project in your area.

- Give much needed equipment and supplies to our species at risk monitoring and habitat restoration programs.

Imagine the difference $10,000 could make tomorrow.

- Restore critically endangered Garry Oak meadow or coastal Douglas-fir Habitat on south Vancouver Island and the southern Gulf Islands

- Enable the permanent protection and conservation of hundreds of hectares of threatened habitat through conservation covenants!

- Empower and educate over 100 local land owners in becoming better stewards of their land through intensive workshops, site visits and presentations

 

Terms & Conditions* Donations must be made via GivingChallenge.ca or CanadaHelps.org. Minimum $3 donation required. Contest runs from June 1, 2019 at midnight Newfoundland Daylight Time (NDT) to June 30, 2019 at 11:59:59 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT). One (1) CAD $10,000 donation from The GIV3 Foundation to selected charity available to be won. Odds of charity winning depend on number of entries received. Math skill-test required. See full rules at: http://givingchallenge.ca/rules.html.

 

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Earth Day at the Gardens at HCP 2019

Because there is no "Planet B".

April 22, 2019 - Saanich 

By: Ashlea Veldhoen 

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Earth Day is always a time of celebration. It allows us a day to observe our impact on the Earth, renew our Earth-friendly goals for the year, and make new ones, too. At HCP's Earth Day event this past Monday, we witnessed an inspiring range of people from toddlers to seniors come together to celebrate the wonderful planet that we call home. With free admission for Earth Day guests could visit the native plant garden to learn more about our native trees, shrubs and flowering plants. Exhibitors included eco-friendly vendors and organizations including our friends at the Pollinator Partnership, the Greater Victoria Green Team,  Victoria Bug ZooRent the Chicken and Bees Please FarmsWest Coast RefillBespoke Blossoms, books, upcycled clothing, Friends of Tod Creek Watershed, the CRD, and more. The HAT booth was inundated by families with young children curious about our native bat species, owls, volunteering opportunities and more. We also shared our brand new reptile guide with Earth Day attendees as well.

Guests were impressed by Paige Erickson-McGee's "Creating Frog-friendly Spaces" talk, where she explained the importance of using native plants in home gardens to create habitat for native amphibians including frogs, newts and salamanders, as amphibians not only rely on wet, but also forested habitat to survive. Paige then took a large group of attendees on a walk in the nearby Viaduct flats to get a first-hand look at native wetland plants and natural amphibian habitat. We also had a prize draw for a small container garden featuring Blue-eyed Grass, Pacific Water Parsley and Few-flowered Shooting Star. 

Earth Day is a day we reflect on the impact our actions have on the Earth both now and over the long term, as well as celebrate the wonderful things nature provides to us from fresh drinking water, clean air, producing wholesome nutritious foods, isn't it time we give back to nature? We believe it should be Earth Day every day, which means reflecting on your actions every day to reduce your impact: Doing simple things like walking or cycling to work, minimizing your use of single use-plastics, re-using and repurposing plastic containers and even packing a bagged lunch can all contribute to reducing your ecological footprint.

Because there is no "Planet B".

Thanks to Saanich Native Plants for donating the container garden and to the Gardens at HCP for the use of their indoor pavillion and providing access to Viaduct Flats for our Frog-friendly Spaces Walk & Talk. 

Earth Day at the Gardens at HCP 2019

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For a list of all the attendees, see below!

Haliburton Community Organic Farm Society | Victoria Master Gardener Association | Victoria Bug Zoo | Usborne Books | Bees Please Farms/Rent The Chicken | The Truffles Group | Pollinator Partnership/Island Pollinator Initiative | Greater Victoria Green Team | West Coast Refill | Bespoke Blossoms | CRD Watershed | Creatively United | Friends of Tod Creek Watershed | Friends of Maltby Lake Watershed Society | Christa Brenan (sustainable fashion)

Want to know more? See the links below: 

To get more involved, consider volunteering with HAT's Habitat Restoration program, where you can help improve wildlife habitat by performing hands-on restoration work in your community! Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to sign up as a volunteer today! 

For more information on Amphibians, download our Amphibians guide and visit our page on Amphibians

For more information on Reptiles, download our Reptile guide and visit our page on Reptiles

For more information on how you can report amphibian roadkill, fill out our online form.

Want to hear from HAT more often? Subscribe to receive our monthly e-news, where you will get updates on volunteer opportunities, upcoming talks, events and more! 

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Earth Day Celebration at Metchosin Boys and Girls Club a windy, but happy affair

Earth Day Celebration at Metchosin Boys and Girls Club a windy, but happy affair

Metchosin - April 14, 2019 

By: Ashlea Veldhoen 

It was a blustery day for a barbecue but with the help of some amazing volunteers and a wonderfully organized team of people, the Earth Day Blitz in Metchosin was a wonderful success with over 200 people came to participate in the Earth Day festivities despite the windy weather. Many of the participants were from the Metchosin area, some of which were Boys and Girls Club members, some of whom were from the Scia'new (Cheanuh) Youth Field Team and some were from the BC Nature Kids group. With crafts and face painting, music, food and education, this event was chock-full of fun things for families to do! 

HAT volunteers Alf, Robbie, Bob and Ronna were key to the success of the event, helping set up, run the HAT table and even barbecuing! Our Executive Director, Katie was also there to lend a helping hand at the food stand. Volunteers from the Boys and Girls Club were very keen and lead the crafts tables, scavenger hunt and field games during the event.  

The Bald Eagles Band - a local band made up of retired naturalists - played the entire event, with classics like "Brown Eyed Girl" and "Margueritaville" competing with the wind for a chance to shine. 

We had three very well-attended walk and talks, one each hour during the event. At 12:00 pm the Metchosin Biodiverity Group led a walk on using the free mobile application iNaturalist to help locate and identify local wildlife - from seedling to butterfly to mammal to bird - with the help of other users online, many of whom are professional scientists by trade. This walk had the highest number of attendees, many of whom stated they found the workshop useful and have committed to using iNaturalist in the future. 

"It's great!" one participant exclaimed with a wide smile. "I will be using this app every time I go into the field from now on". 

From the iNaturalist website: "iNaturalist provides a place to record and organize nature findings, meet other nature enthusiasts, and learn about the natural world. It encourages the participation of a wide variety of nature enthusiasts, including, but not exclusive to, hikers, hunters, birders, beach combers, mushroom foragers, park rangers, ecologists, and fishermen. Through connecting these different perceptions and expertise of the natural world, iNaturalist hopes to create extensive community awareness of local biodiversity and promote further exploration of local environments." Metchosin Biodiversity hopes to continue to use iNaturalist - among other natural science-based apps - to connect people with nature by helping them get to know the species found right in their own backyards. 

The second walk was a plant ID walk by Metchosin Foundation Director, and one of HAT's original founders - Joel Ussery. A long-time Metchosinite and local plant-expert, Joel took attendees on a nature hike through some of the 100-acre property at the Boys and Girls Club to identify some of the amazing plants on the property. 

The third and last walk was a habitat walk and talk with our very own Stewardship Coordinator Paige Erickson-McGee, who separated her small group of attendees into teams "slug" and "turtle", tasking each with finding potential habitat for each animal as the hike progressed. During the walk, Paige highlighted some of the different types of habitat found throughout the Boys and Girls Club camp area, from meadows to ponds to shrubby riparian habitat to forest. At each habitat stop Paige took a moment to ask participants which species might be found in each. The group found fur from an Eastern Cottontail rabbit (an introduced species) near the shrubby riparian habitat, saw a mother goose sitting on her nest at the edge of a pond, heard Chestnut-backed Chickadees, Golden-crowned kinglets, American Robins and Bushtits, and visited the location of three new HAT-made turtle nesting habitats. Participants were excited to find a small Leopard slug and a Pacific Tree Frog in some shrubby riparian habitat with rotting logs.

At the end of the event, participants, staff and volunteers all gathered in a circle and to make an Earth Day promise to reduce their impact on the Earth. We used an Earth-shaped balloon and attempted to keep it from touching the ground to symbolize our promise to uphold the Earth. We released the balloon into the air to begin the exercise, but unfortunately the wind and invasive blackberries had other plans for us. Before we were able to touch the balloon a second time, the wind had carried the balloon over our heads and directly into a blackberry patch. This we took as a symbol of its own, a warning, perhaps, of what might be to come if we don't uphold our promise - as individuals, as a society, and as a one-planet community.  

Earth Day at the Boys and Girls Club 2019

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This event was made possible thanks to Myah and the amazing team at the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Victoria, Kem and the Metchosin Biodiversity group and Joel Ussery and the Metchosin Foundation.

 

 boys and girls club BCG logo   Metchosin Foundation

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If there’s a rustle in your hedgerow...it might be a pollinator!

If there’s a rustle in your hedgerow...it might be a pollinator!

April 2, 2019 

By: Paige Erickson-McGee & Ashlea Veldhoen

Hedgerows have become a lot more mainstream since Led Zeppelin confounded fans everywhere by using the word in their hit song Stairway to Heaven all those years ago.

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So, what is a hedgerow and who wants one anyway?

A hedgerow is just what it sounds like: a dense hedge, made up of a variety of different plants lined up in a row. And we are not talking about the overdone cedar hedge along every other property in the region. Depending on the type, size and density of the plants used, a hedgerow can not only provide pollen, nectar and habitat for pollinators, but also serve as ‘living fences’ between properties, windbreaks, catch dust and block noise, and even increase carbon storage. That is why HAT has begun to include hedgerow plantings as part of our Good Neighbours Program, which focuses in the Wildwood Creek Watershed in Metchosin, part of HAT’s 3-Year Wildlife Corridor Project linking habitat on private land from East Sooke to the Sooke Hills.

Sea Bluff Farm in Metchosin is investing in nature for a long term pay off for their farm and pollinators, a win-win relationship that can result in improved pollination, increased crop yields and thus economic benefits for the farmers, all while improving habitat for local pollinators.

Farm Managers Sasha Kubicek and Robin Tunnicliffe accepted an opportunity to partner with HAT’s pilot program for land managers to co-pay for habitat installations as part of the HAT Good Neighbours Program. Already a certified organic farm, Sea Bluff is an ideal location for planting a pollinator hedgerow by offering a sheltered space away from pesticide use, which would otherwise compromise its effectiveness as pollinator habitat.

On March 25 2019, HAT, Sea Bluff Farm, and Saanich Native Plant co-hosted a hedgerow planting across a 300-foot (90-m) fence line where 17 volunteers planted over 223 native shrubs and perennial wildflowers. Plant species were selected to provide the longest continuous bloom possible, from February to October with native species such as June Plum (Oemleria cerasiformis), Oceanspray (Holodiscus discolor), Saskatoon Berry (Amelanchier alnifolia), Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium), Woolly Sunflower (Eriophyllum lanatum), and Yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Bob Mitchell, second generation Metchosin farmer and operator at Sea Bluff since 1982, is thrilled to support pollinator stewardship on the farm, noting its educational benefits for local schools. “It will be great for the kids on the school buses who drive by on their way to Witty’s Lagoon” says Bob. “They can stop to look at the hedgerow and learn about them on class field trips.”

Photo: Hedgerow volunteers and HAT staff at Sea Bluff Farm - By: K. Miskelly

For the bee’s sake

BC has more than 450 species of native bees. That is more than the number of birds in all of Canada! So identification to species can be challenging and often isn't possible from a photograph. Most of our 

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native species (about 70%) do not live in hives but are solitary, living in the ground or hollow stems. Solitary meaning that after mating, they prepare and provision their nests without cooperation with other bees. Although they often will nest together in numbers when a good nesting area is found, the bees are only sharing a good nesting site and not cooperating, including the Blue Orchard Mason Bee (Osmia lignaria). None of them make honey (the honey bee – Apis melliforma – is not native to North America). Many of them do not sting. Our native bees come in a rainbow of colours including iridescent blues and greens, with only a very small number of species sporting the more familiar black and yellow bands. All bees evolved to use pollen for their protein source instead of animal prey. Think of them like wasps turned vegetarian, you’d virtually never expect to see a bumblebee (Bombus spp.) or any other bee visit the meat grilling on your backyard barbecue.

Currently, bee populations across the country are declining. Without enough food and nesting habitat on the landscape, pollinators are unable to find the resources necessary to survive. And bees are not the only ones. Right now, it is estimated that over 40 percent of all of Canada’s insects are also currently in steep decline. This reduction in bee and other insect populations can be attributed to wide-scale habitat loss to agriculture and development in combination with increased pesticide use and new diseases from introduced pollinator species.

Since insects are the basis for many food webs, their loss is likely causing chain reaction population declines in species that rely upon them – including our birds, reptiles, and amphibians. Faced with this knowledge, it seems only logical that we have a responsibility to support the recovery of our pollinators. Fortunately, conservation organizations including HAT are making it easier to do just that. HAT has begun a new initiative in partnership with local farmers and volunteers to plant or maintain hedgerows consisting of native trees, shrubs and plants that produce flowers and fruit – valuable food for bees and other pollinator insects.

Photo: Mason bee on Oregon Grape By: L. Weidenhammer

For better crops

Over a third of our native pollinating insects, such as leafcutter bees (Megachile spp.) and sweat bees (Halictidae spp.), provide important pollination services for fruit, vegetable and other crop growers on Vancouver Island. Over one-third of our total diet is dependent, directly or indirectly, upon insect-pollinated plants, so inviting them into our farms using hedgerows makes sense from a social, economic and ecological perspective. Almost 90% of flowering plants need pollinators to reproduce, so bees are a critical element to ecosystem stability. Hedgerows on farms supplement pollinator habitat to feed, shelter and reproduce, but benefits of these hedges or not limited to pollinators.

“Hedgerows are very important from the point of view of shelter, for nesting birds, and especially migratory songbirds. We’ve had a lot of storms over the last few years and I think a lot of farms would have benefitted greatly from a higher hedgerow near them to provide shelter for their buildings and crops. Hedgerows are very important sites for pollinators, as nesting sites as well as for their safe cover and pollen and nectar sources” – Bob Maxwell, Co-chair of the Peninsula and Area Agricultural Commission (retired) and owner of Fieldstone Farm.

Now during spring on Sea Bluff Farm, bees and other pollinators will be able feed on the hedgerow’s wild flowering plants all season long. In late summer and autumn, the hedgerow’s “messy and wild” appearance means that they also provide vital safety for late season birds and queen bumblebees that must fatten up to hibernate over winter.

Robin and Sasha sum it up perfectly by describing their motivation, “To us the many benefits of the hedgerow more than compensate for the small cost of installation and maintenance. It’s a small way for us to honour the insects and creatures who give us so much.”

HAT offers tips on managing a pollinator-friendly hedgerow:Dorothy with native plants PC Ashlea Veldhoen web

  • Site preparation is extremely important, but not difficult. Removing undesirable vegetation like Himalayan Blackberry, and laying down cardboard topped with thick mulch will reduce maintenance in the future.

  • Plant as densely as you can: planting 3-5 gallon-sized shrubs or perennial wildflowers per metre will result in a beautiful and functional hedge in 2-3 years.

  • Keep at least one mature native tree within each hedgerow – Dogwood, Scouler’s Willow, or even Garry Oak.

  • Where possible, cut hedgerows back on a three-year cycle - cutting no more than a third of hedges in any year. Cutting annually stops the hedgerow flowering and fruiting.

  • Where possible, cut in rotation rather than all at once as this will ensure some areas of hedgerow on your farm will always flower.

  • Hedges managed for pollinators should ideally be cut between November and January, in an A-shape. If they must be cut outside this, cut in rotation, so some areas remain undisturbed.

  • Let some plants grow “wild and messy” in hedgerows on top, side-trimming only. All those nooks and crannies are key nesting spaces for birds and hibernating bumblebees.

  • Where hedgerows must be cut along the roadside for safety, allow the inside to flower.

  • Aim for a hedgerow that is as high as possible, but ideally 2.5m above ground level.

  • Avoid spraying any herbicide near the hedgerow. Use mechanical weed control such as a weed-eater or hedge trimmer only when necessary.

  • Create a mulched buffer margin at the hedgerow base to prevent grasses and weeds from sprouting up and competing with planted stock.

To find out more about how to manage hedgerows for pollinating insects, and download the Designing and Planting Hedgerows (link to PDF) Guide published in partnership with Pollinator Partnership Canada, Saanich Native Plants, and HAT.

Want to be a Good Neighbour to Nature and plant your own hedgerow? Get in touch with us! Call: 250-995-2428 or E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo: Dorothy E. with native plants - By: A.Veldhoen

 

Some of the smiling faces of those who helped with the event, below!

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The HAT Good Neighbours Project is funded by people like you, and Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, Metchosin Foundation, EcoAction Community Fund, and sponsorship by Saanich Native Plants Nursery and Consulting.

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Support our Good Neighbours Program

Thank you to our wonderful sponsors for helping fund this event!

HCTFMetchosin Foundationeco actionsaanichnativeplants

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